Ambages

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Contents

English

Etymology

From Old French ambages (French ambages), from Latin ambāges, from ambi- + agere (to drive).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA: /ˈambɪʤɪz/

Noun

  1. Indirect or roundabout ways of talking; circumlocution.
    • 1621, Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy, Book I, New York 2001, p. 169:
      Having thus briefly anatomized the body and soul of man, [...] I may now freely proceed to treat of my intended subject , to most men's capacity; and after many ambages, perspicuously define what this melancholy is [...].
  2. Indirect or roundabout routes or directions.
    • 1993, Anthony Burgess, A Dead Man In Deptford:
      Paris put fear into him, a city of monstrous size to which London was but a market town. Its ambages of streets bewildered.

Thesaurus

anfractuosity; bypass; circuit; circuitousness; circumambages; circumbendibus; circumlocution; circumvolution; convolution; crinkle; crinkling; detour; deviation; deviousness; digression; excursion; flexuosity; flexuousness; indirection; intorsion; involution; meander; meandering; obliqueness; periphrase; periphrasis; rivulation; roundabout; roundabout way; roundaboutness; sinuation; sinuosity; sinuousness; slinkiness; snakiness; torsion; tortility; tortuosity; tortuousness; turning; twisting; undulation; wave; waving; winding


Latin

Noun

ambāges (genitive ambāgis); f, third declension

  1. circuit (roundabout way)
  2. long story
  3. circumlocution, evasion, digression
  4. ambiguity

Inflection

Number Singular Plural
nominative ambāges ambāgēs
genitive ambāgis ambāgium
dative ambāgī ambāgibus
accusative ambāgim

ambāgem

ambāgīs

ambāgēs

ablative ambāgī

ambāge

ambāgibus
vocative ambāges ambāgēs
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